Entrepreneurship Everywhere


Sample Entrepreneurship Education
Programs in the United States


VERMONT

Mt. Mansfield Union High School

Laurel Ann Butler

Business Faculty and School-to-Work/Career Advisor -
Community Service Learning
Mt. Mansfield Union High School
211 Browns Trace Road
Jericho, VT 05465
(802) 899-4690 ext 1638/
E-mail: Laurel.Butler@cesu.k12.vt.us
Web Page: http://www.mmu.k12.vt.us

Abstract: Business Principles/Economics and Entrepreneurship serves General Education; College-Prep and At-Risk Students - I have students from all learning spectrums as well as socio-economic environments. They are mostly seniors and a few juniors interested in learning about the world of business and entrepreneurship. Approximately 75% of the students will pursue post secondary education and the remaining 25% will enter the job market/other.

"Welcome to the dynamic, changing and challenging world of business/entrepreneurship and your opportunity to learn more about it. The course will help you build a solid foundation of established business principles and practices that form the groundwork for all business operations. Business fundamentals such as economic, legal, and social foundations will be presented along with organizing businesses, marketing products and services, financing operations, managing and developing employees and making difficult business decisions in a dynamic competitive global environment. Especially recommended for those "enterprising - "entrepreneurial" students who are considering starting a business and or owning/operating a business enterprise. Students will assist in operating the school's store - the Cougar's Den; build a business through team efforts; and help to finance a small business venture(s) in a third world country, plus follow its work through micro-credit financing. Guest speakers, visit to businesses and organizations and/or tradeshows are all part of this course."

Student Needs: to help students become more aware of innovative solutions to our global society's pressing social problems. Just as young entrepreneurs change the face of business, social entrepreneurs act as the change agents for society, seizing opportunities others miss and improving systems, inventing new approaches and creating solutions to change society for the better.

Kinds of Activities: Students will be introduced to the concept of social entrepreneurship and micro credit/financing - through videos: "Pennies a Day" - featuring 2006 Nobel Peace Prize Winner Muhammad Yunus and the Grameen Bank ; "The New Heroes" - dramatic stories of fourteen daring social entrepreneur who are undaunted by the chronic challenges of poverty, illness, unemployment, violence and ignorance they see in the world around them; and others; students will:

  • Preview and have discussion groups
  • Complete worksheets
  • Produce simulation skits
  • Hear from those actually volunteering their time in Haiti and the Dominican
  • Micro-finance individuals in third world countries with the grant funds

STUDENTS RESEARCH PROGRAMS THAT DO MICRO LENDING TO THIRD WORLD COUNTRIES: I.E. - KIVA.org - Kiva's mission is "to connect people through lending for the sake of alleviating poverty". Kiva is the world's first person-to-person micro-lending website, empowering individuals to lend directly to unique entrepreneurs in the developing world; the Grameen Foundation, Mission Statement: Grameen Foundation's mission is to empower the world's poorest people to lift themselves out of poverty with dignity through access to financial services and to information. With tiny loans, financial services and technology, we help the poor, mostly women; start self-sustaining businesses to escape poverty. Founded in 1997 by a group of friends who were inspired by the work of Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, our global network of microfinance partners reaches over 4 million families in 27 countries; and other more local i.e. VIC - The Institute on the Caribbean - Vermonters doing work in Haiti and the Dominican Republic - micro lending and volunteer efforts for health care, healthy foods, education, and clean water - this group also works with Shelburne Farms in Shelburne, Vermont - doing projects on susustainability.

  • Students will make small micro finance loans to third world country individual entrepreneurs to help them with the purchase of their business-related items such as: a sewing machine, materials or livestock that can dramatically improve their life and their families, thus empowering them to earn their way out of poverty.
  • Students will follow/keep track of their micro finance loans and stay in contact with those they have financed. The intent is for the loans to be repaid so that the monies may be further loaned out to others in need.
  • Students will work to raise awareness of their micro-credit lending program - and also do volunteer work for others - a community service learning component.

Expected Outcomes: Students will have a real impact on helping others lives and thus learn that a small amount goes far in many places; that we all share the same world. Hopefully students will take greater pride in learning to take care of their environment, others and learn to give back to their communities.

Stafford Technical Center

Cheryl Niedzwiecki
Stafford Technical Center
Room 119/ The Campus Store
8 Stratton Road
Rutland, VT 05701
STC 802-770-1189; The Campus Store 802-770-1178
Email: cniedzwiecki@rutlandhs.k12.vt.us

Abstract: Students participating in the Hospitality and Entrepreneurship program explore the hospitality-related industries, as well as entrepreneurship. Students will gain knowledge and the necessary skills to seek entry-level employment within the hospitality field, pursue their own business, and/or further their education at a post-secondary institution. The appropriate employability and workplace behaviors will also be covered. Customer service and industry standards are included in the curriculum and are applicable in many areas of business and commerce. The curriculum includes the National Retail Federation Customer Service Certification, hospitality marketing, finance, co-op opportunities, the operation of the Campus Store and the Heritage Family Credit Union STC branch, business plan projects, hosting and guiding various school-wide events, community service, field trips, and guest speakers.

The program uses a variety of experiences for the students including

  • interactions with business owners, salespeople, former students, those employed in the hospitality industry.
  • Instructor and students role-play and demonstrate appropriate and inappropriate handling of common situations in the hospitality industry.
  • DECA competitions and business plans
  • On-line Research
  • The Campus Store
  • Heritage Family Credit Union STC branch
  • School wide functions
  • Co-op experiences
  • Field Trips to various Vermont based businesses,

Vermont REAL Enterprises

Ms. Patti Coultas
LAPDA
P O Box 545
Morrisville, VT 05661-0545
802-888-1105
Fax: 802/888-5734
Email: info@lapdavt.org

Focus:Experiential entrepreneurship education for elementary, middle, and high schools, as well as community colleges and adult entrepreneurship programs. Also adaptable for after-school, out-of-school, and camp contexts.

Geographic Area: Vermont

Products and Services: Comprehensive professional development program for instructors (institutes, in-service seminars, site visits); experiential, activity-based entrepreneurship curricula with integrated technology and student workbooks for high school/post-secondary ("REAL entrepreneurship") and elementary/middle schools ("Mini/Middle REAL"); materials and support for establishing successful local and statewide programs; evaluation and documentation of student demographics, learning outcomes, and business development results; School-Based Enterprise module/training.

Age Level: Children (grades 5-8), youths (grades 9-12), and adults of all ages

Key Partners: At the local level: entrepreneurs, small business assistance providers, and community development advocates through a community support team created by each local program. Organizational partners: LAPDA, REAL Enterprises.

Abstract: Founded in the early 1980s, REAL Enterprises' mission is to help individuals, schools, communities, and rural America grow through hands-on entrepreneurship education. REAL is committed to preparing youths and adults to be active, self-sufficient, and productive citizens and effective contributors to community and economic development by: creating and sustaining a national network of dynamic entrepreneurship educators supported by effective member organizations, providing high-quality hands-on entrepreneurship curriculum and training for K-16 educators; advocating for experiential education and entrepreneurship; and documenting REAL's effectiveness for students and teachers. REAL serves and supports schools and teachers through nonprofit national and member organizations throughout the United States, six of which serve states in the ARC service region.

How it Works: At the high school/post-secondary level, REAL guides students through the process of creating small businesses of their own design. The process includes:

  • self-assessment to determine students' potential and existing marketable strengths
  • community analysis to identify needs and trends in the local economy
  • researching/writing a comprehensive business plan for a student's chosen enterprise
  • start-up support for participants who choose to open and operate enterprises.

A community support team of entrepreneurs and others from the local community assists each local program. REAL has been successfully integrated into existing post-secondary degree/certificate programs and has demonstrated its ability to create successful businesses.

In elementary and middle schools, Mini/Middle REAL helps students explore entrepreneurship in the context of a fully functioning in-school community (with a "Merchant's Mall," government, revenue, and court system), understand the economic implications of career and lifestyle choices, and apply entrepreneurial practices to school-based enterprises and community needs.

VIRGINIA

BusinesStart of People, Incorporated of Southwest Virginia

Welthy H. Soni, Director of Economic and Community Development
1173 West Main Street
Abingdon, VA 24201
540-619-2239
Email: welthysoni@naxs.com
Web site: www.businesstart.org

Focus: Adult entrepreneurs and potential business owners.

Geographic Area: Eighteen counties and two cities of southwestern Virginia. Five counties of upper east Tennessee also served partially; further expansion planned.

Products and Services: Classroom training, individual technical assistance, marketing services, incubator without walls, newsletter, loan capital available, individual development accounts.

Age Level: Adults of all ages. Youths 18 and over.

Key Partners: Department of Housing and Community Development, Small Business Administration, Small Business Development Centers, First American Bank, First Union Bank, Highlands Union Bank

Abstract: BusinesStart's mission is to provide economic alternatives for low income entrepreneurs throughout the region. In support of this mission it provides:

  1. A formal twelve-hour Business Basics class which is taught in every county throughout the region.
  2. A six-hour financial management class for all loan recipients.
  3. Access to capital. Loans ranging from $500 to $25,000 are available to qualified applicants.
  4. Pre-loan technical assistance and post-loan counseling and technical assistance is offered to all program participants.
  5. Marketing program to wholesale and church-based markets for home-based businesses.
  6. Incubator without Walls services, providing entrepreneurs with free or low-cost access to experts providing a wide range of business-specific services, as well as legal, accounting, and public relations services.
  7. Formal economic literacy training classes.
  8. Matched savings for low-income savers interested in starting or expanding a small business, home ownership, or higher education.

Carroll County Public Schools

Winner of the ARC Springboard Award - 2003

Gary Larrowe
Kim Adair, Entrepreneurial Education Coordinator
Carroll County Public Schools
605-9 Pine St.
Hillsville, VA 24343
276-728-3191
Email: kadair@naxs.net
Email: glarue@vt.edu

Focus: Regional focus on developing entrepreneurial strategies for a depressed area

Geographic Area: Multiple counties in Southwest Virginia

Age Level: Youth of all ages

Key Partners: Carroll County Economic Development, Virginia Cooperative Extension through Virginia Tech, Crossroads Rural Entrepreneurial Institute, AmeriCorps VISTA, and the Kauffman Foundation,

Abstract: In 1998 the Carroll County Superintendent of Schools helped to create The Office of Economic and Education Development. As part of the "resource development" function of this office, programs such as Mini Society and EntrePrep were acquired through the Kauffman Foundation as well as many other grant-funded, community and economic development-based programs. Carroll County Public School System has been a catalyst of change for new thinking about education and educational roles to prepare youth for the new economy.

Virginia Cooperative Extension along with the Department of Agriculture and Applied Economics at Virginia Tech has been a vital partner in the entrepreneurial effort. 4-H seeks to assis youth in becoming self-directing, contributin members of society. 4-H involves youth ages 5 - 19 and both teen and adult volunteers. The Center for Economic Education at Virginia Tech has been addressing the problem of economic illiteracy in an Extension-based effort to help schools and teachers incorporate economics into their curricula.

The newest partner in the regional economic effort is the Crossroads Rural Entrepreneurial Institute, developed by community leaders to improve the lives of people in the region. They are providing an innovative economic development-educational engine that tightly couples a broad scope of economic development potential with the educational opportunities of the community. The CREI curriculum indicates immediate areas of expansion through the business incubator and an economic development magnet school. Wytheville Community College will move their Galax Education Center (satellite campus) to the CREI, which will allow for additional course offerings wrapped around entrepreneurship.

Entreprep

Gary Horton
Entreprep
605-9 Pine Street
Hillsville , VA 24343
540-728-3191

Focus: Students learning from mentors

Geographic Area: Southwest Virginia

Age Level: High school seniors

Key Partners: Virginia Tech, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Council on Economic Education,, Kauffman Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership, Wytheville Community College, and the school systems of Pulaski, Carroll, Wythe, and Grayson counties, and the City of Galax.

Abstract: The Entreprep program teaches entrepreneurship to rising high school seniors. It involves a week-long training session, quarterly meetings, and doing 150 hours of work with a mentor. Students who complete all the requirements receive a $1,000 scholarship for the college of their choice. Students gain insight into vocational options and select their own mentors. Stuents have given the program the following title…"Together as One Empowered by All."

4-H Youth Entrepreneurship

Rudoph Powell, Extension Specialist, 4-H Youth
104 Cooperative Extension Building
Box 9081, Virginia State University
Petersburg, VA 23806
804-524-5965
Fax: 804-524-5057
Email: rpowell@vsu.edu

Focus: High school entrepreneurship, private enterprise, leadership

Geographic Area: All Virginia youths. Program is delivered through 107 local Virginia Cooperative Extension offices.

Age Level: Youths between the ages of 14 and 19.

Key Partners: Virginia Tech, Virginia State University, and private enterprises.

Abstract: Virginia has a youth entrepreneurship program that is conducive for implementation in school, with community clubs, after school, and with other partnership organizations. The "Minding My Own Business" (MMOB) project is designed for senior 4-H participants. The curriculum includes How to Prepare a Business Plan, Understanding the Business Operations, Pricing Your Product or Service, Advertise That Business, Managing Business Affairs, Developing a Professional Image, Interviewing Employees, Resources, and References for Further Research.

Workshops have been conducted during state volunteers' conferences, after-school programs, national 4-H agents conferences, national entrepreneurship conferences, state 4-H conferences, and in-service educational for extension agents.

Granville Academy

Michael Artson
President & CEO
Granville Academy
1210 Fox Run Place
Woodbridge, VA 22191
Phone/Fax: 703-490-5738
E-mail: mikeartson@yahoo.com

Focus: The mission of Granville Academy is to provide at risk youth in grades eight through twelve with the fundamental skills in business, finance and entrepreneurship in biweekly sessions over five years.

Geographic Area: Virginia

Age Level: 8th-12th grade

Abstract: The Granville Academy has been preparing youth for economic empowerment for over 18 years. What started in Trenton, NJ in 1983 as a free after school program teaching business to youth has blossomed into the Granville Education Program.

The Granville Education Program encompasses after school program in several states, including Baltimore, MD, Cleveland, OH, Trenton, NJ, Waterbury, CT, North Carolina, and Northern Virginia. The national office provides central administration for the affiliates.

In addition to the after school programs, the Granville Educational Program operates charter schools in Trenton, NJ serving grades K-12, and oversees the Fruit of the Holy Ministry (FOTHM) program. FOTHM operates parallel to the after school program and teaches the importance of moral and ethical values in business and in life.

Lonesome Pine Office on Youth

Winner of ARC Springboard Award - 2002

Curtis Laney
Project Coordinator (Bush Mill Project)
Lonesome Pine Office on Youth
P O Box 375
Nickelsville, VA 24270
276-479-3655
Email: nickel@mounet.com

Focus: Partnership to develop rural community creativity in youth.

Geographic Area: Virginia

Age Level: 14-21

Abstract: This school-based enterprise was established with the support of the Nickelsville Ruritan Club, the Scott County School System, the Rural Area Development Association, the Heart of Appalachia Tourism Authority, and the Virginia REAL Enterprise program. The program was established in October 2001 to teach children aged 14-21 how to own and operate their own business: a 100-year-old corn meal and flourmill at historic Bush Mill.

Six students participating in the Rural Area Development Association (a community action agency) program worked on making repairs to the millrace and the historic mill after school and on weekends. During the Christmas season, students worked with Ruritan Club members to open and promote the "Country Mill Store" at Bush Mill, the first attempt at a retail outlet for the corn and flour products.

In an area where community pride has been damaged by years of hard times, this project has awakened the desire to reinforce the bonds between youth, their mentors, and their home place. Civic pride is being strengthened as people, young and old, lend their talents to the creation of this enterprise. Ruritan Club volunteers worked with the youth to repair the millrace that diverts water to the huge overshot waterwheel. The four remaining millers in the area are passing on their skills to the youth as they work on the actual mill and grind corn. Old ways are combined with new ideas as the minds of these youth are opened to both the past and future through this experience. The Stay for Life Project at Bush Mill is a combination of the old and of the new. It's a combination of a 100-year-old mill and our young people. It forges a connection between them and the history of the community.

The Lonesome Pine Office on Youth provides technical support for the development of the school-based enterprise, and provides support for the REAL Enterprise youth entrepreneurship curriculum. The Nickelsville Ruritan Club is the caretaker of the mill and works with the youth providing instruction, supervision, and mentoring. The Scott County School System is beginning development of the school-based enterprise connecting Bush Mill with marketing and education efforts at Twin Springs High School. And the Heart of Appalachia Tourism Authority is providing support for promoting Bush Mill in tour books and on web sites.

In addition to creating a school-based enterprise, a historic landmark is being restored and repaired, bringing tourism and retail opportunities into the area. The sense of accomplishment and satisfaction that is attained by all who participate in the project serves to strengthen the entire community.

Marshall Academy

Mary Ellen McCormick
Entrepreneurship Educator, DECA Advisor, NFTE CET
Marshall Academy
7731 Leesburg Pike
Falls Church, VA 22043
703-714-5331
Email: Maryellen.mccormick@fcps.edu
Website: http://www.fcps.edu/marshallacademy/

Abstract: Marshall Academy is a school within a school in the Fairfax County Public School System in Suburban Washington DC. The Entrepreneurship program currently at the Academy is the only such program in the county. Students travel from more than a dozen local high schools to the Academy to take the one credit Entrepreneurship class. In the 2007-2008 the Academy offered Entrepreneurship Level 2, the first level 2 class in Virginia.

Recruiting students for our programs is a year round job. How do we identify and attract qualified students for our Entrepreneurship programs? We use many tactics and strategies to work with students, guidance counselors, parents and the local business community to help create and market a program that all high school students will be a part of. Ms. McCormick has been teaching in the Marshall Academy for eight years joining the Academy as an Internet Marketing Instructor. Currently Ms. McCormick teaches three Entrepreneurship Level one classes and one Level 2 class. She is on the Virginia State Writing Curriculum team for Entrepreneurship Education.

Menchville High School
The Entrepreneurial Mall

Jerry Scicchitano, Assistant Principal,
Menchville High School,
275 Menchville Road,
Newport News, VA 23602
757- 886-7737
Email: Jerry.Scicchitano@nn.k12.va.us

Focus: High school students

Abstract: The Entrepreneurial Mall is comprised of public schools and community partnerships, city, state and international resources enabling students to take an active roll in developing and participating in many entreproneurship opportunities. Students have the opportunity to learn basic business practices and the skills to plan, develop, open and operate a business in a real commercial location in cooperation with local business.

Visualize a large retail site, a closed K-mart store for example. Now fill that store with the enthusiasm of budding entrepreneurs and experience of seasoned business veterans and you have THE ENTREPRENEURIAL MALL, a business enterprise center that is pivotal to career development, school-to-work programs, academic curriculum and entrepreneurship. The program provides intensive programs, mini courses, group and individual projects, business and marketing plan development, occupational education, and experience based career education utilizing the core curriculum.

The Entrepreneurial Mall is managed by students for students. Fourth year students have the overall responsibility of property management. The organizational chart will be broken down into areas of responsibility, as leasing space to the business teams, equipment and office furniture rental, custodial supervision and security. Students will receive core business education at their home school. There will be classrooms and an auditorium where professionals like lawyers, CPA's etc. will hold seminars. Students in the entrepreneur program will develop their business concepts.

Some examples:

  • Web design,
  • brochure design,
  • desk top publishing,
  • PowerPoint presentations,
  • specialty cards,
  • candy shop,
  • auto detailing,
  • baby sitting service,
  • nails and hair braiding,
  • removable tattoo parlor,
  • cell phone accessories,
  • sun glasses,
  • dance lessons,
  • business plan development,
  • science fair project help store,
  • foodservice,
  • arts and crafts,
  • gift baskets,
  • call service for local business,
  • answering service,
  • mail box service,
  • flower arrangements,
  • and many more.

The students will learn about business structure, sole proprietorship, partnerships, and corporations. They will develop their executive summaries, business and marketing plans etc, along with community business leaders and S.C.O.R.E (Service Core of Retired Executives) support and guidance. Once the plan is approved, negotiations with the property management team begins, and the business team prepares for the grand opening and ribbon cutting. As new students enter the program, they could open new business or purchase an ongoing business.

This program demonstrates how collaboration between educational institutions, city and state governments, and the business community can provide an outstanding real life educational experience.

T.C. Williams High School

Daniel Jones
Marketing Instructor/Department Chair
T.C. Williams High School
3330 King Street
Alexandria, VA 22302
703-824-6855
E-mail: daniel.jones@aacps.k12.va.us

Focus: High School juniors and seniors.

Funding Sources: My program is sponsored by The National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE), which requires that a majority of the students are eligible for free or reduced lunch.

Abstract: Entrepreneurship-How to Start and Operate a Small Business consists of two Entrepreneurship classes with 20-25 students in each. The NFTE curriculum is strictly followed, which includes the writing and presentation of a complete business for a small business start-up. Some of the students actually operate their business during the school year and after graduating from the program. Each fall we go to the wholesale district in New York where students buy merchandise to take back and sell during a two-day selling event. Students are then required to write a description of the experience including financial reports.

I have quarterly entrepreneur panels in my classes where three or four local entrepreneurs come in and discuss topics we are currently studying in class. Students also participate in an in-class business plan competition with finalists from each class participating in NFTE's regional competition. From this school year the course is being offered for dual enrollment with Northern Virginia Community College.

Virginia REAL Enterprises

Mr. Paul Kuzcko
Lonesome Pine Office on Youth
311 Wood Avenue
Big Stonegap, VA 24219
540-523-5064
Fax: 540-523-5066
Email: vareal@LPOY.org
Web site: www.realenterprises.org

Focus:Experiential entrepreneurship education for elementary, middle, and high schools, as well as community colleges and adult entrepreneurship programs. Also adaptable for after-school, out-of-school, and camp contexts.

Geographic Area: Virginia

Products and Services: Comprehensive professional development program for instructors (institutes, in-service seminars, site visits); experiential, activity-based entrepreneurship curricula with integrated technology and student workbooks for high school/post-secondary ("REAL entrepreneurship") and elementary/middle schools ("Mini/Middle REAL"); materials and support for establishing successful local and statewide programs; evaluation and documentation of student demographics, learning outcomes, and business development results; School-Based Enterprise module/training.

Age Level: Children (grades 5-8), youths (grades 9-12), and adults of all ages

Key Partners: At the local level: entrepreneurs, small business assistance providers, and community development advocates through a community support team created by each local program. Organizational partners: Lonesome Pine Office on Youth, REAL Enterprises. Experiential entrepreneurship education for K–16

Abstract: Founded in the early 1980s, REAL Enterprises' mission is to help individuals, schools, communities, and rural America grow through hands-on entrepreneurship education. REAL is committed to preparing youths and adults to be active, self-sufficient, and productive citizens and effective contributors to community and economic development by: creating and sustaining a national network of dynamic entrepreneurship educators supported by effective member organizations, providing high-quality hands-on entrepreneurship curriculum and training for K–16 educators; advocating for experiential education and entrepreneurship; and documenting REAL's effectiveness for students and teachers. REAL serves and supports schools and teachers through nonprofit national and member organizations throughout the United States, six of which serve states in the ARC service region.

How it Works: At the high school/post-secondary level, REAL guides students through the process of creating small businesses of their own design. The process includes:

  • self-assessment to determine students' potential and existing marketable strengths
  • community analysis to identify needs and trends in the local economy
  • researching/writing a comprehensive business plan for a student's chosen enterprise
  • start-up support for participants who choose to open and operate enterprises.
  • A community support team of entrepreneurs and others from the local community assists each local program. REAL has been successfully integrated into existing post-secondary degree/certificate programs and has demonstrated its ability to create successful businesses.
  • In elementary and middle schools, Mini/Middle REAL helps students explore entrepreneurship in the context of a fully functioning in-school community (with a "Merchant's Mall," government, revenue, and court system), understand the economic implications of career and lifestyle choices, and apply entrepreneurial practices to school-based enterprises and community needs.

Virginia Cooperative Extension,
Family and Consumer Sciences

Phyllis R. Deel, Extension Agent
Family and Consumer Sciences, Virginia Cooperative Extension
P.O. Box 1160
Clintwood, VA 24228-1160
276- 926-4605
Fax: (276) 926-4614
E-mail: phdeel@vt.edu

Jeannie M. Mullins, Extension Agent
Family and Consumer Sciences, Virginia Cooperative Extension
P. O. Box 10
Jonesville, VA 24263-0010
276- 346-1522
Fax: (276) 346-1537
E-mail: jmmullin@vt.edu

Focus: Crafts marketing program for rural adults

Abstract: The Purely Appalachia Craft Empowerment (PACE) program was one outcome of an intensive home-based and micro-business educational initiative begun in the early 90's by Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE). This initiative, funded by a Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) grant, was led by a group of extension agents from far southwest Virginia assisted by VCE Extension Specialists. The crafts marketing program grew out of a need to assist traditional crafters in an economically distressed region of the Appalachian Mountains with business and market development. Many families have benefited from the additional income generated through sales of their high quality crafts. The recent marketing efforts of PACE have included display and demonstration in the Daily Mail's Ideal Home Show (2000) in London, England; development of an e-commerce web site, and establishment of a gallery and retail store. PACE entrepreneurs have also been instrumental in developing and implementing a series of educational programs designed to increase the knowledge and skills of existing and/or potential craft entrepreneurs.

Phyllis Deel has helped families in Southwest Virginia develop home-based and micro businesses for over a decade. Serving as an extension agent in a region that has chronically suffered from a weak economy, high unemployment, and isolation of the mountains, she has helped families draw from their strengths. Many artisans of traditional crafts have emerged to use their creativity along with a strong work ethic to be a part of the Purely Appalachia Craft Empowerment (PACE) program. The earnings from their crafts have helped many families supplement their low to moderate income.

Jeannie M. Mullins served as coordinator for the PACE program for two years prior to her recent employment with Virginia Cooperative Extension as an extension agent in Family and Consumer Sciences. She created and managed the gallery and retail outlet for PACE crafts and was very instrumental in the development of the training and educational curricula presently offered by PACE. Jeannie has worked extensively with craft entrepreneurs in product development, marketing, and skills enhancement.

PURELY APPALACHIA CRAFT EMPOWERMENT (PACE) PROGRAM-was created as a non-profit marketing program to assist local craft entrepreneurs with business development and marketing services. Serving the coalfield counties of southwest Virginia, PACE specializes in the marketing of traditional high quality crafts. The retail outlet is located in the historic Lay's Furniture and Hardware Building in Coeburn, Virginia.

Virginia Cooperative Extension

Southwest Virginia: Communities in Economic Transition:
"The Youth Component"

Harold Jerrell
Virginia Cooperative Extension
P.O. Box 10
Jonesville, VA 24253-0010

Abstract: The Communities in Economic Transition program began in 1989 with the goal of economic revitalization. Their method was to tap the best resources at hand: the youth and educational sectors. Since then, the program has grown into a multi-disciplinary project that has managed to coordinate the efforts of a number of schools, colleges, universities, and businesses. This program has addressed the issues of community development and economic security and made the major thrust of the program a collaboration of community resources.

The program goal is to face realistically the root of the youth out-migration problem and its economic impact. In doing so, Communities in Economic Transition reveals to southwestern Virginia youth the need for analytical skills, economic responsibility, and an appreciation of the values of rural life. They have an in-depth view of programs that youth have developed that have allowed them to become a part of the solution to the many problems facing young people from rural areas.

A slide program tells the story of what students say is unique to southwestern Virginia. Results of projects chosen by students that enhanced the economic potential of the region are available.

Virginia Small Business Development Center Network

Bob Wilburn, State Director
Virginia Small Business Development Center
707 E Main Street, Suite 300
P O Box 446
Richmond, VA 23218-0446
804-371-8253
Fax: 804-325-3384
Email: rwilburn@DBA.state.va.us
Web site: www.DBA.state.va.us/smdev/

Focus: Business counseling and training

Geographic Area: All of Virginia

Products and Services: Face-to-face counseling, training, and reference materials, including NxLevel courses

Age Level: All ages

Key Partners: : SBA, State of Virginia, Community Colleges, UVA, VT, GMU, JMU, Mary Washington College, banks, and chambers of commerce.

Abstract: Small business and entrepreneurship have become the driving force in the U.S. economy and have emerged as a key development factor in depressed areas. The SBDC program was established to assist these businesses and to improve the probability for their success.

The SBDC program in Virginia has 30 centers, with about one-fifth of them serving clients in the Appalachian area of Virginia. The main deliverable of the SBDC program is broad-based counseling and training. Sometimes these deliverables are combined, such as in the case of our NxLevel training program.

Young Entrepreneurs' Organization (YEO) International

Brien Biondi, Executive Director
Young Entrepreneurs' Organization
1321 Duke Street, Suite 300
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-519-6700
Fax: 703-519-1864
Email: contact Courtney Shafer at cshafer@yeo.org (or at 703-519-6700, ext. 133)

Focus: The Young Entrepreneurs' Organization is a volunteer group of business professionals, all of whom are under 40 years of age and are the owner, founder, co-founder, or controlling shareholder of a company with annual sales of $1 million or more.

Abstract: The YEO mission is to support, educate, and encourage young entrepreneurs to succeed in building companies and themselves.

YEO is a chapter-driven organization run by volunteer members. Each chapter is supported by YEO International, and some of the services provided include access to top speakers, marketing materials, extensive databases, chapter development training, PR and media relations support, workshops, and other educational programs. YEO has more than 2,500 members in 77 chapters around the world. YEO's vision is to expand into more than 100 cities by the year 2000. Members receive a confidential membership directory that lists all YEO members and their businesses and business specialties.

  • Forum Program: Members have described Forum as the number-one benefit of YEO. Forum consists of 10 to 12 YEOers who get together on a monthly basis for discussion in a confidential environment. Three words describe this experience: sharing, caring, and trust. Forum allows members not only to grow in their businesses but in their personal experiences as well. Forum provides the support environment needed for each member to grow and to learn from each other.
  • Monthly Educational Events: A major benefit of YEO membership is the opportunity to learn from outstanding leaders and personalities from industry, academia, and government. YEO chapters usually hold 10 to 11 educational events per year, focusing on a mix of business, social, and cultural issues. Some of the events have included mergers and acquisitions, "lessons from the edge," meetings with the governor, behind the scenes with the L.A. Dodgers, a visit to a surgical unit to watch open-heart surgery, and panel discussions on raising capital.
  • The Axis Newsletter: This YEO monthly newsletter of chapter news and educational articles is an invaluable guide to local and international chapter events.
  • YEOnet: YEOnet connects members around the globe on a 24-hour basis. Members can email other members, register for events, and learn more about each other by using this online member benefit. For more information, please contact YEO International at (703) 519-6700.

Youth Venture
Arlington, Virginia

Director, Youth Venture
1700 North Moore Street, Suite 1920
Arlington, VA 22209
703-527-8300;
703-527-8383 (fax)
Web site: www.youthventure.org

Focus: Providing opportunities for young people to shape their world by launching and running their own community-minded organizations.

Geographic Area: Current service area includes metro Washington, D.C.; metro Boston; New York City; and New Jersey, with expansion plans for several other U.S. sites.

Products and Services: Youth Venture works with its partners to provide a quality real-life entrepreneurial experience to young people. YV offers a grant and/or loan of up to $1500, technical assistance and training, links to mentors, opportunities to travel and win awards or scholarships, program tools, and membership in a network of youths who are shaping their world. Key materials include our Web site, QuickStart Guide for youth, Partner Resource Book, Ally Welcome Kit, and Venturer Action Kit.

Age Level: 12–21 year olds

Key Partners: National, regional, and local youth-based and youth-serving organizations, including ASPIRA Association, Inc.; the National Mentoring Partnership, Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Washington. Also partner with companies and volunteer organizations for adult mentors.

Abstract: Youth Venture’s mission is to change the role of young people in our society by providing opportunities for young people to create their own organizations, to take greater responsibility for their own lives, and to shape their communities and their world.

Young people who want to turn their visionary ideas into community enterprises receive startup grants and/or loans from Youth Venture, along with many other kinds of ongoing support. Venturers are paired with an "ally," or mentor, who gives advice and assistance in a non-controlling way. They also have the opportunity to contact other adult allies who are experts in their fields and have relevant, useful information to share. Youth Venture provides program tools and guidebooks, features Venturers on our Web site and newsletters, and offers the opportunity for Venturers to travel to conferences or to win recognition and awards for their accomplishments. In addition, Venturers belong to a network of youths who are changing their communities, and therefore are part of a powerful movement.

Youth Venture reaches out directly to youths in the community and through our community partners—youth-based and youth-serving organizations that believe in youth ownership and competency and offer Youth Venture to their young people. Together, Youth Venture and our partners provide a nexus of support around each young person that helps him or her succeed in launching his or her venture. In the process, Venturers learn the value of teamwork, persistence, entrepreneurial spirit, and community service. Venturers learn by doing: creating a plan, launching an organization, recruiting a team of youth, and seeing the venture through.

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